July 15, 2016 Youth Impact

7 places to visit in Pakistan

Pakistan is not all what the news channels and newspapers portray it as. There’s a lot more to it apart from just terrorism, politics, and all sorts of other problems. You must have had at least one person say the following to you when you asked him/her about Pakistan: “Pakistan? It is too dangerous.” But how can one just judge the situation of Pakistan without travelling it? It isn’t as bad as it is portrayed. And so what if Pakistan is facing problems? No country is problem-free.

So if anybody plans on travelling around the country, here’s a list of places that must be visited:

 

  • Neelam Valey: Opposite to the Keran sector of Indian-held Kashmir. From the Chella Bandi Bridge – just north of Azaad Kashmir’s capital Muzaffarabad – to Tau Butt, a valley stretches out for 240 kilometres; it is known as the Neelum Valley (literally, the Blue Gem Valley).

Neelum is one of the most beautiful valleys of Azaad Kashmir, and it hosts several brooks, freshwater streams, forests, lush green mountains, and a river. Here, you see cataracts falling down the mountains; their milky-white waters flowing over the roads and splashing against the rocks, before commingling with the muddy waters of River Neelum.1                                                         Image Source: www.pakistantoursguide.pk

 

  • Lake Saif-ul-Malook:This beauty is located at the northern end of Kaghan Valley. It is in the north-east of Mansehra Division of the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province. Not only the mountains surrounding it make the place beautiful, but its reflection in the lake is definitely breathtaking! Su mmers are a good time to go there using the jeeps. However, in winter, it can take quite long to get here and sometimes the jeeps aren’t a good option considering slippery paths.2                                                                       Image Source: www.dawn.com

 

 

  • Kalash Valley:Resting in the Chitral District, this heaven is home to the Kalasha tribe. They construct their homes with logs on the hill sides. The valley is not only famous for its beauty but also the colorful lifestyle, cult ure and festivals.3

Image Source: www.pakjourney.com

 

  • Hingol National Park:This is one of the largest national parks in Pakistan. It rests on the Makran Coast in Balochistan. The topographical features vary from barren forests in north to cooler regions in the west that have regular rainfall. They are home to different plants and animals. Hingol National Park is known to support at least 35 species of mammals, 65 species of amphibians and reptiles and 185 species of birds.4

Image Source: www.wildlife.pk

 

  • Wagah Border:This is the border between Lahore, Pakistan and Amritsar in India. It is famous for its daily flag-lowering ceremony which is carried out by both countries before sunset. The gates are unlocked and the soldiers from both countries carry out a parade which then leads to lowering the flags, folding them, handshake between soldiers from either side and shutting the gates. All of this is witnessed daily by spectators in Amritsar and Lahore every day, with chanting and singing.5

                                                                           Image Source: www.gopakistan.no

 

 

  • Mohenjo-daro:It is an ancient Indus Valley Civilization city that flourished between 2600 and 1900 BCE. Located in the Larkana district of Sindh, Mohenjo-daro means ‘mound of the dead’. Although no greenery around, this dry landscape is a beauty itself and its history is what makes it standout today.6

                                                                       Image Source: www.nationalgeographic.com

 

  • Ranikot Fort: Ranikot, with a circumference of about 26 km, is the largest fort in the world. However, this has not been enough to convince the authorities to develop it as a major tourist attraction.

This fort is easily accessible from Karachi through the National Highway. After departing from Karachi, head to Dadu through on the Indus Highway. The road is in excellent condition. It’s an hour-long journey to San, the home of Sindhi nationalist, GM Syed. A little further from the town there comes a diversion. A rusty board announces that Ranikot is some 30 km away. Even though the road is in pathetic condition, the distance can be covered in 30 to 40 minutes.7

Image Source: www.travelpk.org

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